Giving out money, but creatively:

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Giving out money, but creatively:

Among the recipients of an Arts in Society grant is Denver’s Access Gallery which provides opportunities for young artists with disabilities by offering workshops with professional artists, including, in the center of things below, Michael Gadlin.

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Review: "Remarkable"

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Review: "Remarkable"

Michael Gadlin’s “Arousal in Red,” mixed media on linen panel.

Michael Gadlin’s “Arousal in Red,” mixed media on linen panel.

"Michael Gadlin takes the lead on the walls; he’s someone who actually exhibits all the time. The work included here covers a lot of ground, and the range is so broad that his section could almost be mistaken for a group show. The large paintings are the most important — not just because of their size, but also because of the ambition revealed in their dense, complex and heavily painted compositions. Gadlin not only does the kind of abstraction seen here, but he also works figuratively, as seen in the abstracted faces that make up his current solo at the Buell Theatre, Refugees Welcome..."

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Michael Gadlin continues to deepen his mark

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Michael Gadlin continues to deepen his mark

... at ArtHaus as co-owner and disciplined artist in his upcoming exhibit, “Raw Marks”.

 

ArtHaus Gallery 2012

ArtHaus Gallery 2012

(Denver) Emerging from an enlightening two-month residency last year in La Napoule, France, Michael Gadlin has created a new series of mixed-media abstracts that examine a primitive and evocative fusion of expressive mark-making and tonal shifts. By combining painting and drawing elements, disassembled and reassembled, Michael re-imagines the interplay of raw elements that act as a deep vista of an imaginary landscape in his new show “Raw Marks”. The works are delivered on large paper surfaces, carrying a very thick, impasto like textural quality. 

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Denver Channel 8 rebranding, adding programming, with host Michael Gadlin

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Denver Channel 8 rebranding, adding programming, with host Michael Gadlin


Michael Gadlin, host of "Art Scene," talks with Karen Roehl of Art Students League of Denver on Oct. 20 during a taping of the show in Studio D in the City and County Building. (Seth McConnell, YourHub)

Michael Gadlin, host of "Art Scene," talks with Karen Roehl of Art Students League of Denver on Oct. 20 during a taping of the show in Studio D in the City and County Building. (Seth McConnell, YourHub)

Denver's municipal channel 8 station is in the midst of a rebranding as it launches new programming, a new logo and slogan in an effort to reach a wider audience in the city.

Denver 8 TV, which is available online and to Comcast subscribers within the Denver city limits, broadcasts City Council meetings and committee meetings, but it also has had some award-winning local programming based around the city's music scene and the arts.

Producer Carol Pendergrass Caster, center, talks with Art Scene host Michael Gadlin between segments in Studio D in the City and County Building in Denver on Oct. 20, 2015. (THE DENVER POST | Seth McConnell)

Producer Carol Pendergrass Caster, center, talks with Art Scene host Michael Gadlin between segments in Studio D in the City and County Building in Denver on Oct. 20, 2015. (THE DENVER POST | Seth McConnell)

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Denver exhibits fan the enduring flames of Western art

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Denver exhibits fan the enduring flames of Western art


By Ray Mark Rinaldi
Denver Post Fine Arts Critic

POSTED:   09/28/2014 12:01:00 AM MDT

The new West isn't so different from the old West, really. We still marvel at the wildlife while killing it off nearly to extinction; still worship the virgin land while penetrating it deeper than anyone should to get at its riches.

Western art is similar, too, though it is filtered through a hundred-plus years of rapid development and a 21st-century awareness that we screwed some things up along the way. Still, the truest work takes its cues from our amazing scenery, inspired by a landscape both thrilling and threatening.

 

Look even closer — smarter — and you can link in Michael Gadlin's recent set of oversize abstractions currently in the lobby of the 1801 California skyscraper downtown.

1801 gallery

He scavenges those same blackened forests for pieces of charcoal and uses them like paint, marking canvases with raw, dark lines and pools of gray that are incorporated with acrylics and ink into his creations.

There is something miraculous about the works by definition: He resurrects dead things, turning them into lively and infinite explorations of human consciousness, into the "eternality" of art, as he puts it in his statement.

But they also contain a narrative of important events in the West, less direct, though just as journalistic as the cowboy and Indian paintings of Frederic Remington and Charles Russell.

Artist Michael Gadlin's show, "Entice," runs through Nov. 15 in the lobby of the skyscraper 1801 California, the CenturyLink Tower. At right, workers stroll past the artworks in the background of the lobby.

Today's art has a freer hand. Fair to say Gadlin might have seemed a little crazy in Remington's day. He is less concerned with precision and more with fervor and provocation.

Artists' Talk at "Entice" exhibit at 1801

Artists' Talk at "Entice" exhibit at 1801

His canvases have a primitive quality, defined by overlapping lines and incomplete patterns. There is hardly a brush stroke on any of the seven giant canvases in the exhibition: He applies paint with fingers or chopsticks, or scribbles on them with a ballpoint pen.

Surely, there is structure to the madness. Gadlin happens to be talented at drawing, so his lines are amazingly straight and impeccably spaced when he wants them to be. There are no certain objects in the pieces, though his curves and shapes are clearly influenced by figurative skills. They are sensual and, at the same time, art-historical, with subconscious nods to pictorial traditions.

Their logic, and their appeal, comes from the arrangement of things. Scratches and shapes overlap to give his canvases a captivating depth; planes intersect and trade places. They are full of movement and, while they can be rough and assertive in their disregard for order, there is something tasteful about the way things come together; they feel like the work of a graphic designer whose imagination got the best of him.

In contrast, Kaye is a closer kin to the icons of the old-West style. She works like a documentarian recording the current events of her day in the way of legendary painter George Catlin. Her work has the same urgency, though more exactitude. Trees and birds are perfectly represented, but so is light and shadow. Charcoal can be a messy medium, but Kaye's lines have an undisputed crispness to them. Her black marks stand in stark contrast to her pure white backgrounds.

That said, she's not stiff at all, and varied enough to give her "Bleached Pine" a botanical bearing, while the adjacent "Luminous Flux," depicting a raging wildfire, has impressionistic qualities.

Her depictions of furious flames and charred specimens of bark come complete with a cataloging of where each burn took place, how many homes and acres of forests were destroyed. Coloradans are familiar with the sources of her relics: the Hayman Fire, the Waldo Canyon Fire and others that spread smoke and fear for miles around in recent years.

There is a timelessness to her work, a reference to early scientific drawings combined with a contemporary emotiveness, and the kind of obsession that defines art today.

Like Gadlin, Kaye is both proficient and prolific, and motivated to capture the spirit of her age. The pair have advantages over the big names of Western art past — better tools, more time, hindsight. They may have more to say then Remington and Russell, but their drive to say it is just the same.

Ray Mark Rinaldi: 303-954-1540, rrinaldi@denverpost.com or twitter.com/rayrinaldi

FLASH POINT New drawings by Anna Kaye. Through Nov. 1. Sandra Phillips Gallery. 420 W. 12th Ave. Free. 303-573-5969 or thesandraphillipsgallery.com.

ENTICE An exhibit of recent abstract paintings by Michael Gadlin. Through Nov. 14. In the lobby of the 1801 California building, 1801 California St. Free. artsbrookfield.com.

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Arthaus Gallery Exhibit Seeks the Divine

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Arthaus Gallery Exhibit Seeks the Divine


CULTURE


On Saturday, May 17, the RiNo gallery Arthaus will hold a gala to christen the opening of its “Windows to the Divine” exhibition. This unusual installation combines the works of well-known and emerging artists (59 of them in all, primarily American) under one roof as part of the eighth Fra Angelico Celebration of Art & Spirituality.

Despite the exhibit’s title, only a small portion of the art is explicitly religious. Organizers have intentionally juxtaposed woks of contemporary realism, abstract expressionism, and traditional styles to demonstrate the myriad forms inspiration and spirituality can have.

Arthaus Gallery Exhibit Seeks the Divine

The gala begins at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday the 17th—the exhibit itself opens on Friday and runs until June 7, but by purchasing a $150 ticket to the gala, you’ll get access to Friday's pre-sale of the works. To encourage budding art collectors, organizers have convinced many of the participating artists to offer their work at discounted prices to patrons under 45 years old. The gala will also feature a unique “art and wine” pairing in which local sommeliers have selected particular vintages to accompany certain works, and anyone who buys one of them will receive a bottle of the respective wine.

Finally, Arthaus will offer classes for new art collectors throughout the exhibit’s run. On Sunday, June 1, the gallery is hosting a free viewing party and seminar about the topic, and the gallery is always free to visit between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., Tuesday through Friday.

For more information, visit the Arthaus website.

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Three Painters Pair It Up

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Three Painters Pair It Up


Darrell-Michael-Ron

That's what makes the exhibit "Carte Blanche," currently at the intimate Arthaus gallery, such a pleasant surprise. The show features a trio of Denver painters, Darrell AndersonRon Hicksand Michael Gadlin, and they're clearly bringing out the best in one another.

These artists are well known as independent operators, though lately they've been working as a team, partly as coaches, pushing each other in new directions, and sometimes as direct collaborators, partnering on actual pieces of art.

It's an experiment of sorts among three pals that started about a year ago and will last for another. "Carte Blanche" invites their many fans along on the journey, which so far ranges from pure, old-school representation to fathomless abstraction, with a lot of mixing and matching in between.

Artists can make for great friends, though not necessarily with one another. 

A stylistic mash-up like that would ruin most group shows, and you'd expect as much here, especially when you consider the kind of painting these guys have built reputations upon.

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Denver's Gadlin brings his abstract art home

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Denver's Gadlin brings his abstract art home

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Emerging from a two-month residency last year in La Napoule, France, Michael Gadlin created a new series of mixed-media abstracts that examine a primitive and evocative fusion of expressive mark-making and tonal shifts.

By combining painting and drawing elements, disassembled and reassembled, Michael reimagines the interplay of raw elements in his new show "Raw Marks."

By Amy Norton
YourHub Contributor
Posted:   08/29/2013

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Art Limited

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Art Limited

Perfervid_On_Line_Review.jpg

Michael Gadlin

Perfervid Lines

Ice Cube Gallery, Mixed-media, Denver, United-States
Friday July 22, 2011 - Saturday August 13, 2011 - Event ended.

Typified by arresting powers of visual imagery and spatial sophistication, Michael Gadlin’s artistry is an increasingly recognized phenomenon in the art world. Rimmed in spontaneity, his 15-year repertoire expresses a singular uninterrupted brush stroke of Mediterranean, European and Western influences. Pushing the boundaries of contemporary art form, Michael’s work epitomizes avant-garde.

Perfervid Lines, a new large-scale body of work by Michael Gadlin, offers an evocative fusion,
as his past intersects with his evolving vision. Here are abstract paintings with drawing elements,
disassembled, reassembled and thus, reimagined. The interplay of drawing and painting elements
acts as an underpainting, setting the tone for multiple levels of expression. Gadlin’s aspiration to
develop a fresh, sophisticated and engaging mix of work is fully realized in Perfervid Lines, an
ardent and exuberant meeting of deconstruction and reconstruction, past and present.

Born in Denver, Colorado, Michael Gadlin has been exhibiting work throughout the United
States for over 15 years. As a very young artist, Gadlin studied drawing and painting at the Art
Students League of Denver. After earning some of his tuition money from the sales of pastel and
charcoal drawings while in high school, Gadlin attended Pratt Institute in New York where he
majored in Communication Design and Illustration. In 1999 Gadlin was the youngest artist ever to
win "Best Of Show" at Denver's nationally renowned Cherry Creek Arts Festival. The Vance
Kirkland Museum acquired a work of his as part of their permanent collection. Gadlin currently
exhibits in Aspen, Denver, Vail, and Telluride, Colorado. Gadlin's well-received public art
installation, which was completed in 2004, hangs permanently in Denver's District 2 Police Station.
The Fort Collins Museum of Contemporary Art selected Gadlin to be included in the museum's
2008 "Rocky Mountain Biennial."

Opening Reception
7 | 22| 11
6:00 PM - 10 PM
Ice Cube Gallery
3320 Walnut Street
Denver, CO 80205
303-292-1822
info@icecubegallery.com

More information http://gadlinscanvas.com/home.html

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Park Hill School featured artist

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Park Hill School featured artist

ParkHill_Article_on_School_Visit.jpg

La Napoule Art Foundation Brings Artists to Park Hill Elementary Schools

La Napoule Art Foundation is launching a pilot program with two Denver elementary schools to connect children with working artists in their communities. This outreach program, part of the ongoing show Do You See What I See? A Fine Art Experience for Children and Everyone Else, will partner Ashley Elementary & Park Hill School with exhibition artists Emanuel Martinez and Michael Gadlin. These artists will create work in the schools, demonstrating their own artistic process and encouraging students to explore art in new ways.

Gadlin and Martinez have worked with the schools to develop student projects that reflect their own creative interests. Gadlin is co-owner of ArtHaus, a gallery located in Denver’s RiNo district. He will return to Park Hill, which he attended as a child, to give demonstrations of his work with figurative collage. Students will create their own collage projects to tell their story.

Martinez, an artist known for his murals, has developed a piece that centers on caring – a major theme explored at Ashley this year. Students who have exhibited exceptional caring behavior will help Emanuel with this mural to be hung in the hallways of the school.

This program draws on the increased evidence of the importance of meaningful arts education in children’s lives. Reports from the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities highlight benefits ranging from improved reading and writing scores to engaging students who otherwise struggle with school.

Moreover, by bringing artists and artwork into local schools, LNAF is hoping to highlight the role of the school as a cultural gateway in the community. This project is a natural extension of Do You See What I See?, an exhibition which seeks to make art accessible to children and the general public – to let people enjoy art who might not otherwise come to an art show.

Parents and families will have the opportunity to see student work featured alongside that of the show’s professional artists at Family Day on October 14. Special activities have been planned, including artists working onsite and art-making projects. Members of the public are encouraged to attend to celebrate the importance of artwork in the Denver community.

Martinez and Gadlin are both participants in La Napoule Art Foundation’s artist residency which seeks to give artists the time and space to create removed from the distractions of daily life. The Foundation is pleased to expand the impact of this program by sponsoring alumni to participate in outreach programs within their community.

Do You See What I See? A Fine Art Experience for Children and Everyone Else is showing now through October 14 (Wednesday – Friday 12 pm – 8 pm; Weekends 10 am – 8 pm). Family Day will be held Sunday, October 14 (11 am – 6 pm). Daily entry & Family Day are both free to the public. For more information, call 303-952-0445 or visit www.LNAF.org/programs-events/doyousee.

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LUXE (Featured Artist)

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LUXE (Featured Artist)

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LUXE Life - Creating a Legacy

TENACITY PROPELS A YOUNG ARTIST’S CAREER

Michael Gadlin remembers poring over a sketchpad at age eight, filling its pages with the pastels his mother bought for him off a grocery-store shelf. “It was like putting a puzzle together,” he says of the energy he put into his nascent creations. “I recall finishing and thinking that this—filling in every white space on the paper in front of me—was the completion of something.” It was, in fact, the start of something.

Gadlin would later go to the Pratt Art Institute in New York, where he threw himself into drawing and painting courses, taking away the coveted freshman prize of being one of a handful of students nominated for a full-ride scholarship for the balance of his undergrad years. The honor was huge for this fledgling artist who, two years into Pratt’s four-year program, returned to Denver to be close to his mother as she battled terminal lung cancer.

While in Denver, Gadlin befriended up-and-coming artist Darrell Anderson, who had participated in the prestigious Biennale Internazionale dell’Arte Contemporanea in Florence, Italy, in December 2007. Anderson generously mentored Gadlin by giving him a gallery to work in for free in LoDo. “I don’t think I realized then what a big deal it was that he gave me a key,” reflects Gadlin. Beyond a key, Anderson schooled the budding young artist in the business aspects of pursuing an art career, urging Gadlin to promote himself and to pursue contracts for public art installations. Gadlin’s first such honor was to create the art for District 2 Police Station. His 18 panels, each three feet by three feet, fill a nine-by-eight-foot wall and will, in Gadlin’s words, outlive him and even his daughters—a legacy this humble but tenacious artist holds precious. Gadlin’s art hangs in the Vance Kirkland Museum in Denver as well as in other museums.

Gadlin has come a long way from his days on the streets of Manhattan’s Lower East Side, knocking on doors for a sketching job to supplement expenses at Pratt. Today, he often spends entire workdays, with painting palette in hand, inside his 400-square-foot studio at 15th and Pearl Street. He can recite a long list of serious local collectors who hang his work in their outsized homes that boast plenty of wall space. And yet, he still feels he’s just getting started.

WRITTEN BY NANCY CLARK

LUXE Magazine: The Luxury Home Redefined 2008

 

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