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Current


EXHIBITS

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Current


EXHIBITS

Current + Past Exhibits:


 
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Solo Exhibit

March 2nd through March 31st 2019

Be it public or personal, spiritual or material, enduring or ephemeral, there’s a natural human impulse to make note of the significant that surrounds us. In this upcoming exhibit opening Mar. 2 at K Contemporary gallery in LoDo, celebrated Denver painter and mixed-media artist Michael Gadlin will explore the infinite shades of significance in an eloquent visual language at once deeply individual and instinctively universal.
He’ll chart the tides of diverse subjects in sweeping lines, potent shapes and emergent forms, images and ideas flowing across expansive canvases in a mesmeric dance of order and chaos.
— Stephen Knapp

Review: K Contemporary and Space Offer Different Takes on Abstraction

MICHAEL PAGLIA | MARCH 13, 2019

 

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PBS Filming and Panel Discussion

Tuesday, March 19, 6-9pm
PBS Live Filming & Panel Discussion

 
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PBS Filming and Panel Discussion
Featuring Denver Post Art Critic Ray Mark Rinaldi,
Artist Michael Gadlin & Gallerist Doug Kacena 
Moderated By Louise Martorano the Executive Director of RedLineTuesday, March 19, 6-9pm

"Denver Art: Where We Are and Where We Are Going"

6 - 6:45pm - Drinks / Food and Show Preview
6:45 - 8pm - Live Taping and Panel Discussion

Join us Tuesday evening for a special filming of Rocky Mountain PBS' Art's District- award-winning half-hour arts and culture series that features local and national artists in pursuit of their artistic passions. For this special live taping, panelists: Ray Mark Rinaldi- art critic for the Denver Post, artist- Michael Gadlin, and gallery owner and artist- Doug Kacena will discuss the broad topics relating to the future of art in Denver.  Moderated By Louise Martorano the Executive Director of RedLine

Ray Mark Rinaldi is a Denver-based arts journalist whose work has appeared in publications across the country. He writes a weekly column on culture for the Denver Post and has recently contributed to the New York Times, Dwell magazine, Hyperallergic, the Chicago Tribune and 5280. He’s a former fellow with the National Arts Journalism Program at Columbia University, a 2018 recipient of the Rabkin Prize for Visual Arts Writing and the editor of the online visual arts journal One Good Eye.
 

Michael Gadlin began his art education at the Art Students League of Denver, followed by the Metropolitan State University in Denver and the New York’s prestigious Pratt Institute. He received a residency at La Napoule Art Foundation in France. A former host of ArtScene on Channel TV8 and the current host of Arts District on Rocky Mountain PBS, Gadlin keeps close pace with Denver’s fast-evolving arts environment. He sits on the board of directors at both, Denver’s Museum of Contemporary Art and the PlatteForum. Gadlin is a former co-owner of ArtHaus Gallery and the youngest artist ever to win Best of Show at the Cherry Creek Arts Festival; his work is in the collection of the Vance Kirkland Museum’s permanent collection, Mile High Denver, as well as in numerous private collections nationally and internationally.  

Doug Kacena- 2017 Emmy nominated professional artist, Co-Owner of K Contemporary, Co-Owner of Artuvus Studios, partner with 1261 Gallery and Abend Gallery in 1412 Gallery Collective and an art collector himself, began his artistic career over 20 years ago with his first gallery in Denver. He received his undergraduate education in Fine Art (Painting) and Art History (Modern & Contemporary American Art) from the University of Colorado in Boulder.   Doug is very active in the Colorado arts community believes strongly in supporting and growing the Denver art scene. Former Gallery Director of Evergreen Fine Art Gallery and Sculpture Garden in Evergreen, Colorado, and is represented by K Contemporary in Denver, Colorado. His most recent project "Crossover" is the subject of an upcoming PBS Special in production with Colorado Public Television (CPT12), for which Shared Visions / Schler Productions received the 2017 Emmy nomination. 

Louise Martorano is the Executive Director of RedLine, a non-profit contemporary art center and artist residency located in Denver, Colorado. RedLine's mission is to foster education and engagement between artists and communities to create positive social change. Under her leadership, RedLine has received the Denver Mayor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts (2014 & 2015), the Greenway Foundation’s “Partner in Change” award, and recognition from Denver Public Schools for excellence in community engagement. In 2017, she was awarded a Livingston Fellowship for leadership from the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation. Martorano holds a M.H. from the University of Colorado at Denver with a focus in Contemporary Art History & Music. She also sits on the advisory committee for the Visiting Artist, Scholar & Design program at Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design, is the Board Treasurer for the Global Women’s Empowerment Fund, and is on the Board of Trustees for the Harmony Hammond Trust. 


Past Exhibits:

“As of Now”
K Contemporary Gallery, 2018

“As of Now” continues through Dec. 29, 2018 at K Contemporary.

“As of Now” continues through Dec. 29, 2018 at K Contemporary.


 

K Contemporary now represents
Michael Gadlin

New Work In The Project Space

Michael in his Denver studio,  Nowthateyesee  (behind him), Mixed Media on panel, 80 x 72 inches [sold].

Michael in his Denver studio, Nowthateyesee (behind him), Mixed Media on panel, 80 x 72 inches [sold].


 

“There’s no better language for what's in my heart and my soul until I paint. It’s really about letting go to get closer to the truth."
 

Mixed Media on panel, 80 x 72 inches [sold].

Mixed Media on panel, 80 x 72 inches [sold].

Like a child discovering the sandbox for the first time, I begin this work by seeking an ingenuousness that felt open to all possibilities as an unexplored pursuit. Discovering new symbols and relationships around me. Holding only a nonobjective agenda and choosing tools that were anomalous for the process of laying down material including the paint.

Finding a more primitive and exhaustive method to express my desires. Arriving at a context that feels refreshing to the political world around me. Piecing together forms that seem to have long coexisted. Like play-as-you-go, shapes and forms begin to collide and make interactions that feel undeniably ostentatious. Making a visual story through the history of marks.

I went out of the way to use tools that I found or made. I wanted the tools to provide a bit of a struggle with laying down the material.

"I need to feel tension against the push of the paint onto the surface. Creating marks that translate much less predictably. Making for an interactive play that speaks serendipitously."

 

 
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Past


MICHAEL GADLIN

Exhibit History

Past


MICHAEL GADLIN

Exhibit History


Reconfigured II: Space Gallery, group exhibition, 2018

 

Inclusiveness: McNichols Arts Center, group exhibition, 2017

 

Refugees Welcome: Buell Theater, solo exhibit, 2016

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"The Buell proudly unveils Michael's latest work, large in scale and a stunning addition to the Buell's galleria. His technique is centered around very loose origins, allowing chance and intuition to play the major role. He has delivered a series of exuberant paintings, in which abstraction and representation engage and coalesce into psychologically charged images." 

- Rudi Cerri
Curator and Public Art Administrator / Arts & Venues

 

ReMARKable: Space Gallery, solo exhibit, 2016

Space Gallery Exhibit "ReMARKable" 2016

Space Gallery Exhibit "ReMARKable" 2016

Michael Gadlin takes the lead on the walls; he’s someone who actually exhibits all the time. The work included here covers a lot of ground, and the range is so broad that his section could almost be mistaken for a group show. The large paintings are the most important — not just because of their size, but also because of the ambition revealed in their dense, complex and heavily painted compositions. Gadlin not only does the kind of abstraction seen here, but he also works figuratively, as seen in the abstracted faces that make up his current solo at the Buell Theatre.

- Michael Paglia, Art Critic; Westword.

 

Entice: ArtsBrookfield 1801 California, solo exhibit, 2014

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Solo exhibit at ArtsBrookfield 1801 Lobby

Solo exhibit at ArtsBrookfield 1801 Lobby

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Denver exhibits fan the enduring flames of Western art

Look even closer — smarter — and you can link in Michael Gadlin’s recent set of oversize abstractions currently in the lobby of the 1801 California skyscraper downtown. He scavenges those same blackened forests for pieces of charcoal and uses them like paint, marking canvases with raw, dark lines and pools of gray that are incorporated with acrylics and ink into his creations.

There is something miraculous about the works by definition: He resurrects dead things, turning them into lively and infinite explorations of human consciousness, into the “eternality” of art, as he puts it in his statement.

But they also contain a narrative of important events in the West, less direct, though just as journalistic as the cowboy and Indian paintings of Frederic Remington and Charles Russell.

Today’s art has a freer hand. Fair to say Gadlin might have seemed a little crazy in Remington’s day. He is less concerned with precision and more with fervor and provocation. His canvases have a primitive quality, defined by overlapping lines and incomplete patterns. There is hardly a brush stroke on any of the seven giant canvases in the exhibition: He applies paint with fingers or chopsticks, or scribbles on them with a ballpoint pen.

Surely, there is structure to the madness. Gadlin happens to be talented at drawing, so his lines are amazingly straight and impeccably spaced when he wants them to be. There are no certain objects in the pieces, though his curves and shapes are clearly influenced by figurative skills. They are sensual and, at the same time, art-historical, with subconscious nods to pictorial traditions.

Their logic, and their appeal, comes from the arrangement of things. Scratches and shapes overlap to give his canvases a captivating depth; planes intersect and trade places. They are full of movement and, while they can be rough and assertive in their disregard for order, there is something tasteful about the way things come together; they feel like the work of a graphic designer whose imagination got the best of him.

By RAY MARK RINALDI | media@rayrinaldi.com | The Denver Post

 

Found Objects: ArtHaus Gallery, solo exhibit, 2014

Found Object installation at ArtHaus 2014

Found Object installation at ArtHaus 2014

 

Raw Marks: solo exhibit at ArtHaus gallery 2014

Raw Marks: solo exhibit at ArtHaus gallery 2014

Raw Marks: solo exhibit at ArtHaus gallery 2014